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Indigenous WisdomToday we are submerged in technology. As I type this on my handy dandy laptop I’m streaming Star Trek: Deep Space Nine via Netflix on my Smart TV (I have warned you previously, dear reader, that this Pixie is a Sci-Fi geek) . My Smart Phone is next to me, poised to speedily inform me if I get any e-mails, texts, phone calls or notifications that I’ve been contacted through any of the Social Media outlets that I use.

I, and I’m guessing many of you, own books by Deepok Chopra, Starhawk, Scott Cunningham, Raymond Buckland, Edain McCoy, The Ferrars, Laurie Cabot etc., etc… We read these to further us along on our respective Paths and teach us all sorts of neat little Witchy things. However, I think the main reason we have these is a search for wisdom. Wisdom is indeed something that these authors have to share with us, and they are truly a very valuable resource. I believe we need to start looking beyond them though.

Let me explain what I mean. I think we need to look further into the past, or at least to cultures that are near the beginning of the past (if that confuses you, sorry…just roll with I think you’ll get my meaning soon enough). The indigenous peoples from around the world have said much that we should revisit and learn from. I’ve gathered several quotes and proverbs from many indigenous tribes. I’ve tried to pull wisdom from native cultures around the globe.

The people from these cultures are far more in tune with the cycles of Life and of the Earth than most of us that live in the modern world. I think we need to listen to what these cultures are trying to tell us. Some of their wisdom is good for the every day things of life, others go far deeper than that. Anyway, check out the wonderful nuggets of wisdom I have chosen for you.

Indigenous People of Mexico

)O( Don’t steal; don’t lie; don’t be lazy. – Inca Proverb

)O( The strongest warrior is he who conquers himself. – Aztec Saying

)O( The greatest wisdom is in simplicity. Love, respect, tolerance, sharing, gratitude, forgiveness. It’s not complex or elaborate. The real knowledge is free. It’s encoded in your DNA. All you need is within you. Great teachers have said that from the beginning. Find your heart, and you will find your way. – Carlos Barrios, Mayan elder and Ajq’ij of the Eagle Clan

Indigenous People of North America

)O( A nation is not defeated until the hearts of its women are on the ground. Then it is done, no matter how brave its warriors or how strong its weapons. – Cheyenne Proverb

)O( The elders were wise. They knew that man’s heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too. Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

)O( Everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence. – Mourning Dove,  Salish

)O( Children were encouraged to develop strict discipline and a high regard for sharing. When a girl picked her first berries and dug her first roots, they were given away to an elder so she would share her future success. When a child carried water for the home, an elder would give compliments, pretending to taste meat in water carried by a boy or berries in that of a girl. The child was encouraged not to be lazy and to grow straight like a sapling. – Mourning Dove,  Salish

)O( When we Indians kill meat, we eat it all up. When we dig roots, we make little holes. When we build houses, we make little holes. When we burn grass for grasshoppers, we don’t ruin things. We shake down acorns and pine nuts. We don’t chop down the trees. We only use dead wood. – 19th Century Wintu Woman

)O( We must protect the forests for our children, grandchildren and children yet to be born. We must protect the forests for those who can’t speak for themselves such as the birds, animals, fish and trees. – Qwatsinas (Hereditary Chief Edward Moody), Nuxalk Nation

)O( Do not grieve. Misfortunes will happen to the wisest and best of men. Death will come, always out of season. It is the command of the Great Spirit, and all nations and people must obey. What is past and what cannot be prevented should not be grieved for… Misfortunes do not flourish particularly in our lives – they grow everywhere. – Big Elk, Omaha Chief

)O( The color of skin makes no difference. What is good and just for one is good and just for the other, and the Great Spirit made all men brothers. I have a red skin, but my grandfather was a white man. What does it matter? It is not the color of the skin that makes me good or bad. -White Shield, Arikara Chief

)O( Try to do something for your people – something difficult. Have pity on your people and love them. If a man is poor, help him. Give him and his family food, give them whatever they ask for. If there is discord among your people, intercede. Take your sacred pipe and walk into their midst. Die if necessary in your attempt to bring about reconciliation. Then, when order has been restored and they see you lying dead on the ground, still holding in you hand the sacred pipe, the symbol of peace and reconciliation, then assuredly will they know that you have been a real chief. – Winnebago Teaching

Indigenous People of Europe:

)O( The little fire that warms is better than the big fire that burns. – Irish Gaelic Proverb

)O( A fish from the river, a staff from the wood and a deer from the mountain. – thefts no Gael was ever ashamed of. – Irish Gaelic Proverb

)O( A priest should be learned, but learning won’t make a priest. – Irish Gaelic Proverb

)O( If you want to be a leader, be a bridge. – Welsh Proverb

)O( Speak well of your friend; of your enemy say nothing. – Welsh Proverb

)O( No one is so small that he doesn’t have to bend down; no one is so big that he does not have to stretch. Sami Proverb

)O( Knowledge from the outside does not stay in the head. – Sami Proverb

Indigenous People of Asia:

)O( If I tell you my dream, you might forget it. If I act on my dream, perhaps you will remember it, but if I involve you, it becomes your dream too. – Tibetan Proverb

)O( It is better to live for one day as a tiger than to live for a thousand years as a sheep. – Tibetan Proverb

)O( Medicine that heals is not always sweet and caring words are not always pleasant. – Tibetan Proverb

)O( The highest art is the art of living an ordinary life in an extraordinary manner. – Tibetan Proverb

)O( When drinking water, think about the source. – Tibetan Proverb

)O( It is easier to catch an escaped horse than to take back an escaped word. – Mongolian Proverb

)O( He who drinks, dies; he who does not drink, dies as well. – Mongolian Proverb

)O( Who cleans up the dirt washes away happiness. – Mongolian Proverb

)O( The child learns to walk by falling down.Kazakh Proverb

)O( No matter how much you train the wolf, he still looks at the mountains and howls. – Kazakh Proverb

Indigenous People of Australia:

)O(  Those who lose dreaming are lost. – Aboriginal Proverb

)O(  We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love… and then we return home. – Aboriginal Proverb

 

Phew! I know that was a lot of stuff to read, but I’m hoping you got something out of it. Even if none of these ideas/philosophies aren’t new to you, perhaps they’ll serve as a reminder of their importance. I know some of them have done that for me.

This is just a drop in the bucket though. I encourage you all to look into who the native people of your area are and see what you can learn from them. If you’re a knowledge nut, like myself, then see what you can find out from other indigenous cultures around the world. There are so many fascinating and intensely deep messages to receive if we just open ourselves up to listening. Some of these cultures are gone…but their wisdom should not be lost. It is important, and we should do all we can to continue to make sure that their words live on.

 

Healing with Energy #PaganBlogProjectHealing has been associated with Magickal Practitioners throughout the history of the world. From Ancient Egyptians & Chinese,  to European Cunning-Folk & Wise Women, to Native American Medicine Men & Women, to Modern Day Pagans of a multitude of paths (Along with a whole mess of others, too numerous to list!).

Most of these people had/have a vast knowledge of herbs and tend to also have an understanding of human physiology. However, herbs are not the only manner in which healing can be administered, not by a long shot!

 

Hold it! <Enter squealing breaks sound here>

So, originally I was meaning to post on the various types of healing modalities with brief explanations for each.  It felt like a struggle though, and my mind kept fixating on methods that did not use anything but the practitioner, maybe a little music & mood lighting, and some form of energy that is transferred from the practitioner to the client.

While I am a huge fan of healing by way of herbs, crystals, acupuncture, reflexology, etc.; I am most fascinated by, and most often utilize Energy Healing.

So what is Energy Healing? Well, regardless of what form you use, it is basically the  channeling of  healing energy from the practitioner to the person seeking help. This can be done with hands-on, hands-off, or at a distance. It’s something I believe we are all capable of tapping into, and I’ve always seemed to have quite the aptitude for it myself.

Below are a few types that I am familiar with, and have done myself…I’m sure there are MANY more methods practiced around the world, but this is what the Pixie’s packing in her Healing Med Kit: 😉

Basic Energy Healing: This is a method that needs no special training, and while it may be simple, it is by no means “less than” other modalities. The level of success has more to do with the practitioner than the method itself. I don’t know how others do this, but I’m willing to assume it’s at least similar to the way I do it. When healing energy is requested, I place both feet on the floor and use visualization & intent to summon energy from the Earth. I feel the energy being drawn in through the soles of my feet and move up through my body. If the person in need is with me, I either place my hands on the ailing area or above it (some peeps just don’t wanna be touched…and the area just may be of a, shall we say, sensitive nature). I then direct the energy to and out of my hands and to the person. I have also done this at a distance, I simply face the direction in which the client is located and focus on streaming the energy to them. When I’m done, I have to push that energy back out through my feet and into the Earth…or else I’m all sorts of buzzed up on the excess.

The art of healing comes from nature, not from the physician. Therefore the physician must start from nature, with an open mind.” ~Paracelsus

Reiki: This is the ancient art of Hand-On healing re-discovered by Dr. Mikao Usiu in the mid 1800s after 21 days of intense meditation, fasting and prayer. After he received the information and symbols during his vision he was able to utilize it for healing himself and others. He called the energy used in this healing technique “Reiki” which means “Universal Life Force Energy”.

Reiki works by seeking out the root cause of the ailment, thereby treating its source as well as any symptoms.

Practitioners gain the ability to utilize this Life Force Energy by way of training with and receiving attunements from a Reiki Master (There are 3 levels: Reiki I, Reiki II, and Reiki Master). Once this has occurred, healing is passed on by the practitioner placing their hands in a variety of positions on or slightly above the clients body (Actual touch is not necessary for the energy to be transferred as Reiki energy is smart energy and it will find its way to the area).  If someone is either a Reiki II practitioner or a Master they are also trained to do Distant Reiki if the client is unable to be physically present for the session.

Nothing is so healing as the human touch.” ~Bobby Fischer

Aura Cleansing (The Pixie Method):  The aura is the electromagnetic field comprised of layers containing physical, mental, emotional, & spiritual energies that surrounds our body and extends out roughly 4-5 feet.  This technique just sort of popped into my head the first time I attempted to cleanse someone’s aura during a coven exercise, and I had much success. The client sits in a chair, closes their eyes, and takes a few deep breathes. Take a moment to hold your hands out and find the ‘edges’ of their aura. Scan the aura with your hands (a similar technique is used in Reiki sessions). Once you’ve done that, focus healing energy into any areas you feel may be problematic. THEN comes the fun part! Place your hands at the boundaries of their aura again, and draw any negative energy to the surface and pluck it out. How do you do this? Visualization! Focus your intent on drawing the negativity out with your hands, rather than sending healing through…you’re basically just reversing the process. Once you see the black/gray/brown bits float to the edge, pluck them out and pinch them into little specks of dust to be returned to the Universe for recycling. Do one more pass over the client to make sure you’ve got all the big bits, then finish up by combing their aura up and out with your fingers (Just to get out all the tiny crumbs and make it all pretty again).

Elemental Energy Healing (The Pixie Method): This is very similar to Basic Energy Healing as I call on and direct the energies in a similar manner. This method also popped into my head during a coven healing exercise, and I had very good results. I start out the same as the Basic method: Feet on the floor, client in the room. I then call forth energy from a specific element (again through visualization and intent) Earth energy comes up through the feet and feels cool and dry, when it is projected to the client, it is green. Air energy is absorbed from anywhere on the body, feel it blowing on your skin…it is hot and moist, when projected it is yellow. Fire energy was drawn in through my feet as well, hot and dry, when projected it is red. When calling forth Water energy, I felt it as if rain were falling from the sky (or ceiling, lol) and I absorbed it cold wet energy through my skin, when projected it is blue. I then stream the white light of Spirit to sort of wrap things up. It is quite intense, but works well. Just be sure to ground yourself thoroughly afterward!

In the midst of the sense of tragedy or loss, sometimes laughter is not only healing, it’s a way of experiencing the person that you’ve lost again.” ~Alan Alda

Well, there you have it a nice little taste of the types of Energy Healing that one can do. Like I said, there are TONS more out there, so if none of these are your cup of tea, then look around and see if you find a method that suits you. If for some reason you have trouble finding something you like I have one fail-safe healing method that’s bound to make you feel better…even if it’s just for a little while: LAUGHTER! That shit will fix whatever’s ailing you any damn day of the week!

Laughter is important, not only because it makes us happy, it also has actual health benefits. And that’s because laughter completely engages the body and releases the mind. It connects us to others, and that in itself has a healing effect.” ~Marlo Thomas

 

IrishHeritageYup, that’s what I called it, Irish Heritage Reclamation Day? Why? Well, because in my humble opinion, St. Patrick was a bit of a douche, and I don’t think he should have a day named after him. He is known for 2 things primarily: Driving the snakes out of Ireland, and Bringing Christianity to the Emerald Isle. Well, BOTH of these things are not true. He didn’t drive snakes out of Ireland (no snakes ever existed in Ireland…it is widely believed that these ‘snakes’ were actually Druids)), he converted pagans into Christians but Christianity already existed in Ireland though it was not wide-spread (and his ‘mission’ to do so may have been fueled by his being held captive in Ireland as a teen. You know a little bit of “I’ll show those nasties a thing or two” might have been part of his motivation – yes this is conjecture on my part, but this is my blog, I say what I want, lol).

ANYWAY, St. Patrick’s Day is pretty much a U.S. holiday that was celebrated by early Irish immigrants as a way to band together and be proud of their Irish heritage. This is the time when corned beef & cabbage came into play as well. I think it’s nice that they found something to pull them together as a community during a time when they were all experiencing much hardship.

So, if the snakes that Pat drove out of Ireland were pagans, why on earth do I celebrate on this day? Well, much like early Irish-Americans, I am quite proud of my Irish heritage. I have always felt that my Irish roots run deep, and have always had an affinity for all things of an Irish-Celtic nature. I have two Irish deities in my personal eclectic pantheon. I’ve traced the journey of my Great-Grandfather’s family as they made their way to North America – first into Canada, and then to the U.S. a few generations later. Also, this is a day that meant a lot to my family on a personal level. You see, my Great-Grandparents were married on March 17 (many moons ago), and while they have both moved on from this life, I still like to celebrate their union.

Yes, it’s fun to get schnockered, it’s fun to party, I wholly admit to doing both (though not nearly as rowdily as I once did). Partying and drinking, however are secondary or lower on my list of things to celebrate today.

Ol’ Pat (who was NOT Irish, and who’s color is apparently blue) died on March 17th…ok maybe not cool to celebrate the dudes death, BUT my Pixie-ish spin on THAT would be celebrating the end of his personal crusade to oust the Druids. Today I honor those wise and Holy Ones.

So,  I don’t refer to today as St. Patrick’s Day, as I don’t feel he should be celebrated. I call it St. Paddy’s Day (As this actually elevates those early Irish-American folks…since they were oft times referred to as Paddy’s – yes, also not exactly the nicest term either, but come on, let’s reclaim this shit and turn it positive!!), Irish Day, St. Patsy’s Day (as in Patsy from Absolutely Fabulous, lol), and any number of things that pop into my little Pixie brain.

Today I honor My Heritage. Today I honor My Family. Today I honor the tenacity of Irish Immigrants. Today I honor the Pagans who died rather than shun their beliefs. Today I honor the Irish Deities. Today I honor Me.

 

BrighidHonored by many pagans at Imbolc; Brighid is the Irish Celtic Goddess of Fire: the Fire of Poetic Inspiration and Divination, the Fire of Healing and Fertility, and the Fire of Metal-Working and Crafts.

Brighid has been revered throughout Ireland since the time of the Tuatha de Danann and was such an integral part of the people’s lives that she was incorporated into Christianity as St. Brigid of Kildare in the 7th century CE. 

According to Cormac’s Glossary, a 10th century compilation from oral tradition, she is said to be ‘a Goddess whom poets worshiped’ and patron of healing and smithcraft. She was venerated not only as Brighid, but also as Bride, Briginda, Brigidu, and in North Britain as Briganda, which can be translated as ‘High One or Exalted One’. Other titles include; ‘Ash-less Flame’, ‘Flame of Two Eternities’, and ‘Mother of All Wisdom’.

She was worshiped as St. Brigid in an Irish convent at Kildare, which means the church of the Oak-tree. This was the site of an ancient temple in which a perpetual, ash-less fire burned (this suggests it was a sort of lamp, perhaps fed by oil, tallow or butter). In later Christian times, when the nuns kept the fire burning using wood, the ashes were said to miraculously vanish. In 1220 A.D., the Archbishop of Dublin decided that the fire-cult was ‘pagan’ and ordered the flame to be extinguished. After his death the nuns rekindled the flame until the Reformation when the entire convent was suppressed.

Next Week: I’ll be giving some Correspondences and other such stuffs. 🙂